3PAR HP NetApp Storage Veeam Virtualization VMWare

The Value of Veeam and Storage Array Integration

Time and time again, I get asked by partners and customers what is the value prop behind Veeam Backup and replication integrating with the various storage arrays for offload operations.   Why is there value there? I usually respond by stating that Veeam integrates with specific SAN arrays to let them perform the “heavy-lifting” when creating a backup job resulting in a lot faster backup and restore operations? By why is having quicker backup and restore options that important?

At Veeam, we speak about the 3 C’s of Backup challenges, Cost, Complexity and Capabilities.  Inherent to backup architecture and environments that is considered “legacy” do these challenges exist – Why?  The obvious reason is no doubt that these environments have grown organically and have never really been designed for the type of workloads that we are seeing in todays world. What is troubling is that customers simply get use to these environments and subsequently “accept” the pitfalls of having technology that has been retrofitted for newer trends and workloads – particularly for customers that are new to virtualisation, backup could be an issue that they don‘t realise they need to address.

For example, if a customer wants to restore a single virtual machine, how would they go about that with a conventional backup solution? With Veeam Backup and Replication it is extremely simple. Veeam has great momentum in the market and when you position it with primary storage arrays such as HP 3PAR or NetApp FAS systems  with their unique integration points. These represent the “heavy-lifter” I mentioned earlier in this post, getting a more suitable device to handle specific tasks – for those who are familiar with virtualisation, think vStorage APIs for Array Integration or VAAI – certain storage operations that get offloaded to compliant storage arrays is very similar.

How do we do it?  Veeam Software is an innovative provider of data protection solutions for VMware vSphere and Windows Server Hyper-V environments, and offers integration with HP 3PAR InformOS and NetApp ONTAP based arrays as of version 8 of our backup and replication platform. Veeam Explorer for SAN Snapshots enables IT administrators to recover whole virtual machines and application data directly from SAN snapshots, including HP 3PAR snapshots and NetApp SAN snapshots. This capability enables administrators to quickly restore any or all of a Virtual Machine directly from SAN snapshots, which can be taken throughout the day with very little impact on production systems. This enables short recovery point objectives (RPO) for the most common recovery scenarios: users accidentally deleting data, users deleting emails,  and system updates gone wrong. This in turn provides a better return on investment in both your backup infrastructure as well as your storage infrastructure as its hardware utilisation increases making sure you get maximum use out of your investment, and reducing costs by not having to fork out for more CPU power to handle backup jobs.

Here are the key capability points for Veeam and Storage Array integration: It is fast –  customers will be able to recover an entire VM or individual items in 2 minutes or less. It is flexible – Storage Administrators can restore exactly what they need -quickly and easily: a full Virtual Machine, individual guest files, individual Microsoft Exchange items, Microsoft Active Directory objects. In addition, it is also agent-free; there are absolutely no agents to deploy on virtual hosts or within Virtual Machines so upgrading the software in the future is straight forward. By having this architecture and ease of use, IT administrators can see a reduction in complexity and management of their backups.

So more aggressive RPO’s using compliant SAN based snapshots mean that quicker restore options and lower RTO’s are achievable using Veeam.

Note: Veeam currently supports HP 3PAR and HP StoreVirtual for snapshot integration, NetApp FAS systems will be supported in version 8.0 which is due out in the next month or so.

 

EMC HP NetApp Storage

Gartners Magic Quadrant – “Magic Quadrant for Midrange and High-End Modular Disk Arrays.”

 

Gartner is an independent provider of IT and research advice, Gartner’s latest Magic Quadrant for Midrange and High-End Modular Disk Arrays assesses storage vendors on their “ability to execute” and “completeness of vision.”  Placing the candidates into one of the four quadrants each representing different definitions.

So what does this mean?

Legend
  • Leaders execute well against their current vision and are well positioned for tomorrow.
  • Visionaries understand where the market is going or have a vision for changing market rules, but do not yet execute well.
  • Niche Players focus successfully on a small segment, or are unfocused and do not out-innovate or outperform others.
  • Challengers execute well today or may dominate a large segment, but do not demonstrate an understanding of market direction.

And to be selected, the vendor must meet the following criteria:

  • The vendor must have midrange and high-end modular disk array storage systems commercially available and have active references that are using them in production scenarios.
  • The vendor must generate at least $25 million in annual midrange and high-end modular disk array hardware revenue.
  • The vendor must actively market its branded midrange and high-end modular disk array products in at least two major regions (for example, North America and EMEA, or Japan and Asia/Pacific).
  • The vendor must sell its branded midrange and high-end modular disk array products to user organizations via its direct sales force or through a reseller partnership sales channel.

from http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/research_mq.jsp

From an HP perspective –  Gartner included the following HP Storage solutions:

  • HP 3PAR
  • HP LeftHand
  • HP Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA)

So let’s dissect this and see what changes have occurred since the last period.

Certainly, there has been massive movement shown in this graph , EMC and NetApp’s gap closed slightly and HP’s ability to execute position increased dramtically as did its position in the visionaries quadrant, this is no doubt due to the acquiring, development and rise of it’s 3PAR platform.
There hasnt been much movement from HDS, Dell seems to have taken a sideways step in some ways, IBM remains static since the last period. Its hard to really say who really leads in this view,  NetApp and EMC are  “Leaders” and are performing or executing really efficiently  however HP are also leaders and appear to have a better understanding of the market and where it is going.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I look forward to the 2012 version of this research release, it surely shows there is a healthy competitive environment for this area of technology. Well done to the leading four storage Vendors – EMC, NetApp, HP and IBM.